IT IS HAPPENING ON THESE ACTUALLY CORRECT DATES.  MAY 3-4. FRIDAY-SATURDAY.

IT IS HAPPENING ON THESE ACTUALLY CORRECT DATES.  MAY 3-4. FRIDAY-SATURDAY.

ialac.

ialac.

Just this.

Take Me Out to the (Wiffle) Ballgame

Hello everyone!

So it’s not teeeeechnically Tuesday, which is the alleged day that we “officially” blog on.  It’s Wednesday.  But yesterday, I hadn’t yet found the topic of this blog.  Literally, I found it today in a desk drawer.  Which is not at all where it should have been.  It should be on display with our other priceless office artifacts, including our Miles Austin “You can’t ride in my little red wagon” autographed football, and our picture of the time when the LMTI Staff/Camp Mason Staff went to Medieval Times in LYYYYYNNNNNDDHURRRRRSSSST NEEEEWWWWW JERRRRSSSSEY.  And also our picture of the time Sean pretended to climb out of a window during a staff meeting, which caused Tanya to laugh uncontrollably for ten minutes straight.  But alas, it was in a forgotten desk drawer. 

Oh, I’m talking about this:

That’s right! An official “game ball” from the legendary 2006 LMTI Late Night Under the Tent Wiffle Ball Tournament (LMTILNUTWBT for short).  Legendary for some that is, because most of you were sleeping soundly in your cabins.  But for a proud few, this wiffle ball reflects the glory of all that is glorious in this world.

You might be wondering how a wiffle ball tournament could have possibly taken place under the tent.  There are a lot of chairs, afterall.  But, nonetheless, it happened.  And there is only one thing that you really need to understand about wiffle ball under the tent.  You do not want to be on the receiving end of an Amanda Duncan fastball.  I got pegged on the right inner thigh.  I can still feel the sting.

I’m hoping for a return of the LMTILNUTWBT in 2013.  Listen closely if you’re up there in Apace, Sioux, or Iroquois Villages (sorry Spruce, you’re out of luck).  You may just hear the crack of the wiffle ball bat next August followed by the unmistakable thud of someone crashing into a white folding chair.

-Jamie

Stay true to yourself and what you believe.

Just saw a post on here and wanted to say, not just to the person that posted it, but to everyone in general…

It’s hard when someone makes a decision that seems to be polar opposite of the very thing that brought you together in the first place, isn’t it? Especially when that thing feels so deeply important and integral to how you define yourself and your life.  Maybe it feels like a betrayal.  Maybe it feels like a loss of a friend.  Maybe it feels like a reason to question yourself and what you believe it.

I just wanted to reach out to you guys to let you know that whatever it feels like, it’s alright.  At LMTI we strive to give you all an experience that opens you up to all of your tremendous potential.  An experience that makes you think about who you are and the decisions you’ve made and the ones that you will make.  An experience that makes you realize that you can do so much for yourself and for others, just as you are.  The challenge with “an experience” is how to make sure that it becomes more than that;  that is, how to make sure that the experience continues, even after the tent comes down.

For some, it is easy to keep that experience in your minds and in your hearts.  You remain connected with friends from camp, you do things in your Action Groups, you reflect easily and often on what you learned at camp.  You may feel challenged in your beliefs from time to time (and you should! it’s important for making sure a belief still “fits” and that it still resonates with who you are and where you are), but you still are able stay true to yourself and what you believe.  For others of your, it isn’t as easy.  Maybe you feel pressured.  Maybe you feel lost.  Maybe you feel disconnected.  Maybe it feels like it just doesn’t “fit” anymore, or maybe it feels like it can only exist for those 5 days in the middle of the woods, in the middle of nowhere. 

Wherever you fall in that spectrum…I want you to know it’s alright. Generations upon generations of TI alumni have struggled with this…and the horror of it all is that it’s not meant to be fixed.  I don’t believe it could be if we tried.  Do I wish that every person, regardless of their role at camp, could hold on to all of the messages of LMTI forever and ever and keep coming back? Absolutely!  Wouldn’t that be amazing?? Of course, we don’t have nearly enough cabins and can you imagine how long the lines in the dining hall would be? 

The thing is that, across the board, as you get older, people are going to waver all around you on this issue of drinking.  You (*gasp!*) may waver on this issue of drinking.  Some will never touch it.  Some will touch it and then change their mind and never touch it again.  Some will touch it and they might never look back.   There will be people who you know will NEVER do it…who will.   There will be people who you doubt will come back as CATS…who will.   And you will all have so many varied feelings about all of this.  From hurt to anger to ambivalence. It’s all gonna be there.  

The most important thing is to stay true to yourself and what you believe.  If people’s opinions change, please don’t feel like that in any way diminishes the experiences that you’ve had with those people.  It doesn’t.  Your experience(s) with LMTI is/are yours and yours alone.  Of course, it was shared with so many.  But in the end, you take from LMTI what you need and you hold onto the things that make your heart feel fuller and make you feel more authentically you.  Those are things you already had, of course, LMTI just gave you a little spark to light it all up to the most vivid hue.  

The next generation is coming up right behind you and they are looking for people to inspire them and to lead them and to give them the spark that they need.  Are you up to the task?  I know you are.  

-Jamie


 

believe.

believe.

be brave.

be brave.

more. more. more.

more. more. more.